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Despite what the name may suggest, an energy audit isn’t just for “green” homebuyers. In fact, completing an energy audit before listing your home on the market can help answer any lingering questions a prospective buyer may have – especially around cost.

 

A prospective buyer wants to know how much this house is really going to cost them. The monthly mortgage payment is one thing, but how much will it cost me to maintain the home and make any repairs after signing on the dotted line?

 

Any doubt can lead a buyer to change their mind. An energy-efficient house is an attractive house.

 

So what is an energy audit, and how will it help make your home more attractive to buyers?

 

An energy audit is conducted by a professional to determine where, when, why and how energy is being used in the home. With this data, you now have the opportunity to improve your home’s efficiency and decrease energy costs. Lower utility bills can be a big bragging point – especially when you factor in Calgary’s long winters. The report will show you where to put those improvement dollars, boosting your home’s performance to make it more attractive on the market.

 

When listing your house, there’s nothing more painful than waiting, and waiting for it to sell. Let’s say there are a couple houses on your street up for sale – including yours. Price is in the same ballpark; all have the same selling features. Except your house has gone through an energy audit and as it checks out, you have an energy bill that are half the price of the other two homes listed on your block. As a prospective buyer – which one sounds more appealing?

 

For many Canadian consumers, energy efficiency plays a big factor in purchasing decisions. Energy efficient products help save consumers money, lower utility bills and reduce impacts on the environment.

If a full audit sounds too daunting, there are a few other ways you can improve your energy rating with a few household products. Look for appliances that have the ENERGY STAR and/or EnerGuide Label.

 

When selling your house, you are legally obligated to disclose any problems with it – known as “seller’s disclosure”. To avoid any phone calls – or worse – a lawsuit – from aggravated new home owners, it’s in your best interest to disclose any leaky roof or other issue that would cause discomfort and repair costs to new buyers. Conducting an energy audit before listing your house can help spot any issues before putting your house on the market.

Data supplied by CREB®’s MLS ® System. CREB® is the owner of the copyright in its MLS® System. The Listing data is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed accurate by CREB®.
The trademarks MLS®, Multiple Listing Service® and the associated logos are owned by The Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) and identify the quality of services provided by real estate professionals who are members of CREA. Used under license.
The trademarks REALTOR®, REALTORS®, and the REALTOR® logo are controlled by The Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) and identify real estate professionals who are members of CREA. Used under license.